HISTORY

Images depicting life from Cinder Banks to Shed to Garden




Memorial Garden Timeline


1881 - 1886
Hearts move from Powderhall to the original Tynecastle Park on the site of what is now Wardlaw Street and Wardlaw Place

1886
The club secure tenancy of a meadow from Edinburgh Corporation. Some £200 is spent laying out the ‘New Tynecastle’ with two pitches.

1896
After Hearts win the Scottish Cup for the second time, funds are made available to create a cycle raceway. Over the next few years the cinder banking, in which most spectators stood, are built up and wooden crush barriers are installed

1906
Height of the banking is increases to facilitate ever-growing support

1911
A covered enclosure, over one third of the distillery side, is built ti house 4500 fans. It is christened the ‘Iron Stand’.

1926
Iron Stand demolished. The banking around three sides of the stadium is fully terraced.

1947
A four-year project to concrete the entire stadium is begun. Finishes on schedule in 1951.

1959
A covered enclosure, for 15,000 spectators, is erected on the wets side of the stadium and over 20 years of the north terrace. The completion of this project is part funded by the sale of Dave MacKay to Tottenham Hotspur for £32,000.
The Shed is born Hearts fans congregate under this structure for more than three decades before it is demolished for the re-building of Tynecastle, This begins with the Wheatfield Stand in 1994 (holding 5902 fans)

2015
Plans unveiled to honour Hearts fans with a Memorial Garden incorporating a sculpture in the shape of the Hearts crest, three symbolic benches and the 1914 Memorial Trust Bronze

McCrae’s Battalion

Never have so many owed so much to so few. Although these words were spoken by Winston Churchill in assessing the Second World War, the same applies to the conflict that preceded it.

In November 1914, with Heart of Midlothian comfortably leading the First Division, 16 players removed their football boots for those of the Army, enlisting to fight in France. In doing so, they became the first British team to sign up en masse. They were part of the now legendary "McCrae's Battalion" (the 16th Royal Scots) or the Provost's Battalion (the First Royal Scots) and fought valiantly.

Nowhere was this more true than at the horrors of the Somme, where the British army lost 20,000 men on the first day alone. This included three Hearts players.

The example of Heart of Midlothian inspired fans and fellow professionals alike to answer the call of King and country. By the time the war concluded, seven Hearts first-teamers had made the ultimate sacrifice. They were:


  • SERGEANT DUNCAN CURRIE
  • SERGEANT JOHN ALLAN
  • LANCE CORPORAL JAMES BOYD
  • CORPORAL TOM GRACIE
  • PRIVATE ERNEST ELLIS
  • PRIVATE JAMES SPEEDIE
  • PRIVATE HENRY WATTIE


To honor these men and the many others who fought in both world wars, a memorial was erected in 1922. It is presently situated in the Haymarket, near the offices where the first batch of players enlisted. The Forever in Our Hearts Memorial Garden will also feature seven benches, each of which will feature the names of these seven heroes.


The Shed

The Memorial Garden is built on the site of ‘The Shed’, an area remembered by generations of Hearts supporters as a cauldron of noise.
Witnessing some great games, the Shed holds a special place in the heart of many Jambos – and is a fitting area for to remember our lost ones
The wall of the shed still stands and remains an integral part of the garden.


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